anthropology editor website

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A full set of resources to accompany this feature can be downloaded for free here. Calling all English teachers: does this sound familiar? As structure gcse english lit essay go through extracts in the last lesson on Friday afternoon, you ask carefully crafted questions, and note with satisfaction how students shoot their hands up in a flash, like Barry Allen on the run. Later, back at home, you mark them. What went wrong?

Anthropology editor website dead connection book report

Anthropology editor website

ISSN: Editor-in-chief: John R. About this journal Open Anthropological Research is an international open access, peer-reviewed academic journal that publishes original, high-quality research on all aspects of anthropology. Your Benefits Why subscribe and read Open Anthropological Research provides an international publishing platform for research topics in anthropology. Why submit Open Anthropological Research is a peer-reviewed, open access journal, which means that contributions can easily achieve worldwide readership.

Authors of Open Anthropological Research benefit from: no article submission or article processing charges APCs in transparent, comprehensive and fast peer review efficient fast-track publication worldwide dissemination and accessibility of articles promotion of each published article free language-correction services for authors from non-English speaking regions secure archiving by De Gruyter and the independent archiving service Portico.

Volume 1 Issue 1. January Policy Forum Unable to retrieve citations for this document. The State of Anthropology in Poland. Page range: Law 2. In this essay, I analyze the effects of this law on ethnology and anthropology in Poland. I look at how the law affected anthropological research, especially its financing, and training, including enrollment of students. I place this discussion withing the broader context of reforms aimed at Polish higher education.

Anthropology and Pandemics Unable to retrieve citations for this document. Merrill Singer, Barbara Rylko-Bauer. Abstract This paper examines the COVID pandemic in light of two key concepts in medical anthropology: syndemics and structural violence. The paper concludes with a discussion on the role of anthropology in responding to COVID from a syndemics perspective. Research Article Unable to retrieve citations for this document.

Alfred Montoya. Abstract This article explores the discursive and practical marking of male sexual minorities in Vietnam, as targets of a series of biopolitical regimes whose aim, ostensibly, was and is to secure the health and wellbeing of the population from the French colonial period to the present , regimes which linked biology, technoscientific intervention and normative sexuality in the service of state power.

Martha Lincoln. In the early months of the novel coronavirus pandemic in the United States, this perspective on the social value of death emerged in diverse contexts, particularly in claims that deaths were a necessary consequence of returning economies to normal. Necrosecurity discourse encourages audiences to perceive coronavirus fatalities as neither preventable nor exceptional, and to perceive themselves as facing little risk of infection or death.

Overlooking the realities of infectious disease epidemiology, these accounts portrayed COVID as a mild disease and imagined a population of robust and physically normative individuals who would survive an epidemic unscathed and ready to return to work.

These appeals articulate with powerful cultural tropes of survivorship, in which statistical calculations of relative risk and life chances—ostensibly cited to inspire hope for an individual outcome—conceal a zero-sum calculus in which ill or susceptible individuals are pitted against one another.

In contrast to the construct of biosecurity—the securing of collective life against risk—necrosecurity paradoxically imagines the deaths of vulnerable others as a means of managing shared existential dangers. Unable to retrieve citations for this document. Theodore Powers. How can this disease response be contextualized within the broader dynamics of citizenship across South African history?

Building on these questions, I analyze South African efforts to control the COVID pandemic alongside the state response to an outbreak of bubonic plague during the colonial era. I propose that the South African state carries within it divergent historical continuities, some of which carry forward the necropolitical modalities of the colonial and apartheid eras and others that redistribute resources to safeguard life. Kristin Hedges, Gideon Lasco. Abstract This paper uses the lens of medical populism to analyze the impact of biocommunicability on COVID testing through a case study approach.

The political efficacy of testing is traced through two mini-case studies: the Philippines and the United States. Using the framework of medical populism, the case studies pay attention to the ways in which coronavirus testing figured in 1 simplification of the pandemic; 2 spectacularization of the crisis; 3 forging of divisions; and 4 invocation of knowledge claims.

Identifying and critically analyzing how knowledge is generated is an essential step to recognizing the impact that political styles have on the COVID pandemic. Their actions shaped how the pandemic—as well as their responses—is measured.

This framework contributes to public policy debates by providing evidence of the impact of medical populism on pandemic response efforts. Matthew Chrisler. Abstract Alongside a crisis of public health, COVID has also engendered a crisis of social reproduction in the domain of public education.

Drawing on conversations and collaborations with K education advocates in the Phoenix metropolitan area, this essay deploys an activist methodology to identify political struggles and turn the ethnographic lens onto the publics and political economies that shape them. After situating contemporary Phoenix schooling in the regional history of the southwest-turned-sunbelt, I examine emerging features of pandemic education in managed dissensus , caretaking achievement , and education technology enclosures.

Further, as districts pursued virtual schooling, I show how an institutional project of caretaking achievement produced new patterns of alienation, disengagement, and punishment among teachers and students. Third, I consider how technology created unequal enclosures of parents and students in new gendered, racialized, and ableist regimes of education.

As the pandemic continues into , anthropologists should continue to examine public education and social reproduction as sites where state power, racism, and colonialism are expressed and transformed. The upheaval of that subjecthood during the pandemic has raised important questions about the purpose of the college experience as well as how to belong to a place that is no longer there.

William H. Abstract Although public responses to national and international crises are never without contestations and conflicting truth claims, the COVID pandemic draws attention to the stark political and cultural divisions presented by conservative populism in the age of the Tea Party Movement and Donald Trump.

The editors believe it is time to definitively push anthropology beyond its association with elitism and its colonial legacy and to make it relevant not only for understanding cultural difference, but also for making a difference. In its journey into the dilemmas and challenges of the contemporary world, Public Anthropologist avoids standardizing intellectual efforts into specifically formatted articles. Rather, it welcomes diversity and creative writing.

Articles published in the journal should be accessible yet authoritative, appealing yet not sensationalist. A submission must be the work of a specialist, but without jargon; methodologically rigorous, and yet politically engaging. The editors invite articles and special issues committed to making anthropology speak directly to other scholars and to the wider public on issues related to war, rights, poverty, security, access to resources, new technologies, freedom, human exploitation, health, humanitarianism, violence, racism, migration and diaspora, crime, social class, hegemony, environmental challenges, social movements, and activism.

We encourage both ethnographic and more theoretical submissions. Although the journal mainly focuses on contemporary issues, we also welcome submissions that adopt a historical perspective. The journal also publishes reviews of books, films, and documentaries that deal with relevant challenges and opportunities of our time and encourages reviews of both scholarly works and fictional literature as well as the work of activists, journalists, and artists.

Reviews of non-English materials may be submitted. Public Anthropologist addresses a broad readership of social and cultural anthropologists, sociologists, ethnographers, political scientists, social and cultural historians, political historians, political actors, policy makers, activists, journalists, and artists. Articles should be between and words in length.

Reviews should comprise between and words. Visit the Public Anthropologist blog for lively conversations, original posts, comments on work published in the journal, previews of Tables of Contents, and more! For editorial queries and proposals, please contact the editor-in-chief, Antonio De Lauri. Public Anthropologist Award PUAN-A PUAN-A is awarded to a social and cultural anthropologist who has published an outstanding contribution that addresses — in innovative, engaging and compelling ways — key societal issues related to one or more of the following topics: violence, war, poverty, social movements, freedom, aid, rights, injustice, inequality, social exclusion, racism, health, and environmental challenges.

Submit Article. ISSN: Print Only. Publisher: Brill. Social Sciences. Comparative Social Sciences. Critical Social Sciences. Global Studies. For further information, contact your sales manager. For further information, contact our distributor. Free access.

Authors: Luigi Achilli and Gabriella Sanchez. Pages: 1—7 Online Publication Date: 04 Mar Download PDF. Restricted Access. Authors: Gerhard Hoffstaedter and Antje Missbach. Pages: 8—31 Online Publication Date: 04 Mar Pages: 32—55 Online Publication Date: 04 Mar Author: Caitlyn Yates. Pages: 56—72 Online Publication Date: 04 Mar Hollywood and the Myth of Criminal Convergence. The Case of Sicario: Day of the Soldado.

Author: Alice Massari. Pages: 73—92 Online Publication Date: 04 Mar Author: Caitlin Procter. Pages: 93— Online Publication Date: 04 Mar Author: Peter Andreas. Pages: — Online Publication Date: 04 Mar Author: Vito Laterza. Author: Deniz Daser. Author: Gunnar M. Washing Knives. Author: Sally Campbell Galman. Pages: — Online Publication Date: 05 Oct Author: Amelia Frank-Vitale.

Authors: David N. Gellner and Krishna P. Author: Nichola Khan. Affective Politics and Disappearance in Kashmir. Ather Zia. Author: Omer Aijazi. Jessica Stern. Author: Anna Gopsill. Khalid Sekkat. Is Corruption Curable? Author: David Jackson. Shahram Khosravi. Precarious Lives: Waiting and Hope in Iran. Lorna Tucker director. Author: Thomas McIlwraith. Gregory Feldman. The Gray Zone. Author: Marta Scaglioni.

Michelsen Institute Norway.

ESSAY ON MY IDEA OF A HAPPY LIFE

Editor-in-chief: John R. About this journal Open Anthropological Research is an international open access, peer-reviewed academic journal that publishes original, high-quality research on all aspects of anthropology. Your Benefits Why subscribe and read Open Anthropological Research provides an international publishing platform for research topics in anthropology.

Why submit Open Anthropological Research is a peer-reviewed, open access journal, which means that contributions can easily achieve worldwide readership. Authors of Open Anthropological Research benefit from: no article submission or article processing charges APCs in transparent, comprehensive and fast peer review efficient fast-track publication worldwide dissemination and accessibility of articles promotion of each published article free language-correction services for authors from non-English speaking regions secure archiving by De Gruyter and the independent archiving service Portico.

Volume 1 Issue 1. January Policy Forum Unable to retrieve citations for this document. The State of Anthropology in Poland. Page range: Law 2. In this essay, I analyze the effects of this law on ethnology and anthropology in Poland.

I look at how the law affected anthropological research, especially its financing, and training, including enrollment of students. I place this discussion withing the broader context of reforms aimed at Polish higher education. Anthropology and Pandemics Unable to retrieve citations for this document. Merrill Singer, Barbara Rylko-Bauer.

Abstract This paper examines the COVID pandemic in light of two key concepts in medical anthropology: syndemics and structural violence. The paper concludes with a discussion on the role of anthropology in responding to COVID from a syndemics perspective. Research Article Unable to retrieve citations for this document. Alfred Montoya. Abstract This article explores the discursive and practical marking of male sexual minorities in Vietnam, as targets of a series of biopolitical regimes whose aim, ostensibly, was and is to secure the health and wellbeing of the population from the French colonial period to the present , regimes which linked biology, technoscientific intervention and normative sexuality in the service of state power.

Martha Lincoln. In the early months of the novel coronavirus pandemic in the United States, this perspective on the social value of death emerged in diverse contexts, particularly in claims that deaths were a necessary consequence of returning economies to normal.

Necrosecurity discourse encourages audiences to perceive coronavirus fatalities as neither preventable nor exceptional, and to perceive themselves as facing little risk of infection or death. Overlooking the realities of infectious disease epidemiology, these accounts portrayed COVID as a mild disease and imagined a population of robust and physically normative individuals who would survive an epidemic unscathed and ready to return to work.

These appeals articulate with powerful cultural tropes of survivorship, in which statistical calculations of relative risk and life chances—ostensibly cited to inspire hope for an individual outcome—conceal a zero-sum calculus in which ill or susceptible individuals are pitted against one another. In contrast to the construct of biosecurity—the securing of collective life against risk—necrosecurity paradoxically imagines the deaths of vulnerable others as a means of managing shared existential dangers.

Unable to retrieve citations for this document. Theodore Powers. How can this disease response be contextualized within the broader dynamics of citizenship across South African history? Building on these questions, I analyze South African efforts to control the COVID pandemic alongside the state response to an outbreak of bubonic plague during the colonial era. I propose that the South African state carries within it divergent historical continuities, some of which carry forward the necropolitical modalities of the colonial and apartheid eras and others that redistribute resources to safeguard life.

Kristin Hedges, Gideon Lasco. Abstract This paper uses the lens of medical populism to analyze the impact of biocommunicability on COVID testing through a case study approach. The political efficacy of testing is traced through two mini-case studies: the Philippines and the United States. Using the framework of medical populism, the case studies pay attention to the ways in which coronavirus testing figured in 1 simplification of the pandemic; 2 spectacularization of the crisis; 3 forging of divisions; and 4 invocation of knowledge claims.

Identifying and critically analyzing how knowledge is generated is an essential step to recognizing the impact that political styles have on the COVID pandemic. Their actions shaped how the pandemic—as well as their responses—is measured. This framework contributes to public policy debates by providing evidence of the impact of medical populism on pandemic response efforts. Matthew Chrisler. Abstract Alongside a crisis of public health, COVID has also engendered a crisis of social reproduction in the domain of public education.

Drawing on conversations and collaborations with K education advocates in the Phoenix metropolitan area, this essay deploys an activist methodology to identify political struggles and turn the ethnographic lens onto the publics and political economies that shape them. After situating contemporary Phoenix schooling in the regional history of the southwest-turned-sunbelt, I examine emerging features of pandemic education in managed dissensus , caretaking achievement , and education technology enclosures.

Further, as districts pursued virtual schooling, I show how an institutional project of caretaking achievement produced new patterns of alienation, disengagement, and punishment among teachers and students. Third, I consider how technology created unequal enclosures of parents and students in new gendered, racialized, and ableist regimes of education.

As the pandemic continues into , anthropologists should continue to examine public education and social reproduction as sites where state power, racism, and colonialism are expressed and transformed. The upheaval of that subjecthood during the pandemic has raised important questions about the purpose of the college experience as well as how to belong to a place that is no longer there.

William H. Abstract Although public responses to national and international crises are never without contestations and conflicting truth claims, the COVID pandemic draws attention to the stark political and cultural divisions presented by conservative populism in the age of the Tea Party Movement and Donald Trump.

The vivid and symbolically elaborate performance of patriotism and indignation by the Tea Party Movement declined in , being replaced by a more belligerent and less colorful form of populism with Donald Trump. Ordering from Brill. Author Newsletter. How to Manage your Online Holdings. Sales Managers and Sales Contacts. Ordering From Brill. Discovery Services.

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Email this content Share link with colleague or librarian You can email a link to this page to a colleague or librarian:. Your current browser may not support copying via this button. Do you want to stay informed about this journal? Click the buttons to subscribe to our alerts. Public Anthropologist. Editor-in-Chief: Antonio De Lauri. Anthropologists have long engaged communities and topics that are central to contemporary debates.

However, although cultural and social anthropology have produced many insights to help us understand the world in which we live, anthropologists have mostly turned their conceptual and therefore ethical gaze inward, with few notable exceptions. Public Anthropologist , an international, peer-reviewed journal, opens the possibility for dialogue and debates that are timely and socially and politically challenging. The journal examines the issues of our time in a way that both encourages and scrutinizes a diverse range of shifts outwards from the purely academic realm towards wider publics and counter-publics engaged in cultural and political exchanges and collective collaborations for change.

Public Anthropologist boldly and candidly confronts conditions of violence, inequality, and injustice and explores ways in which anthropology might generate public awareness and have an impact on political change. The journal is interested in the space in which newspapers, television, political actors, new media, activists, experts, and academics continually mobilize positions that support or challenge dominant narratives.

The editors believe it is time to definitively push anthropology beyond its association with elitism and its colonial legacy and to make it relevant not only for understanding cultural difference, but also for making a difference. In its journey into the dilemmas and challenges of the contemporary world, Public Anthropologist avoids standardizing intellectual efforts into specifically formatted articles.

Rather, it welcomes diversity and creative writing. Articles published in the journal should be accessible yet authoritative, appealing yet not sensationalist. A submission must be the work of a specialist, but without jargon; methodologically rigorous, and yet politically engaging. The editors invite articles and special issues committed to making anthropology speak directly to other scholars and to the wider public on issues related to war, rights, poverty, security, access to resources, new technologies, freedom, human exploitation, health, humanitarianism, violence, racism, migration and diaspora, crime, social class, hegemony, environmental challenges, social movements, and activism.

We encourage both ethnographic and more theoretical submissions. Although the journal mainly focuses on contemporary issues, we also welcome submissions that adopt a historical perspective. The journal also publishes reviews of books, films, and documentaries that deal with relevant challenges and opportunities of our time and encourages reviews of both scholarly works and fictional literature as well as the work of activists, journalists, and artists.

Reviews of non-English materials may be submitted. Public Anthropologist addresses a broad readership of social and cultural anthropologists, sociologists, ethnographers, political scientists, social and cultural historians, political historians, political actors, policy makers, activists, journalists, and artists.

Articles should be between and words in length. Reviews should comprise between and words. Visit the Public Anthropologist blog for lively conversations, original posts, comments on work published in the journal, previews of Tables of Contents, and more! For editorial queries and proposals, please contact the editor-in-chief, Antonio De Lauri. Public Anthropologist Award PUAN-A PUAN-A is awarded to a social and cultural anthropologist who has published an outstanding contribution that addresses — in innovative, engaging and compelling ways — key societal issues related to one or more of the following topics: violence, war, poverty, social movements, freedom, aid, rights, injustice, inequality, social exclusion, racism, health, and environmental challenges.

Submit Article. ISSN: Print Only. Publisher: Brill. Social Sciences. Comparative Social Sciences.

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