retriever

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A full set of resources to accompany this feature can be downloaded for free here. Calling all English teachers: does this sound familiar? As structure gcse english lit essay go through extracts in the last lesson on Friday afternoon, you ask carefully crafted questions, and note with satisfaction how students shoot their hands up in a flash, like Barry Allen on the run. Later, back at home, you mark them. What went wrong?

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Retriever

The Curly-Coated Retriever is considered to be one of the oldest of all the retriever breeds. He is thought to be descended from the 16th-century English Water Spaniel, the St. Distinguished by his coat of small, tight, water-resistant, crisp curls, this multipurpose hunting retriever is reliable, robust, and highly intelligent. One of the more independent retriever breeds, the Curly may appear somewhat aloof, but he is always willing to please.

The distinctive coat protects these superb retrievers from harsh weather, icy water, and punishing ground cover. Another breed hallmark is the long head—unique among retrievers—that projects a smart and kindly expression. The Golden Retriever originated in the Scottish Highlands in the late s.

He started with the lone yellow puppy he obtained from a litter of black Wavy-Coated Retrievers whelped in southern England in , eventually breeding this dog to a female Tweed Water Spaniel a breed now extinct. Several yellow pups that resulted became the foundation for a distinctive line of very talented yellow retrievers that became known as excellent working dogs. The Labrador Retriever probably originated not in the area of Labrador, in northeastern Canada, but on the adjacent island of Newfoundland, where going back to the s, fishermen worked with sturdy, eager-to-please, water-loving dogs who helped haul in lines and nets and retrieved fish that fell off of hooks.

As more people settled in the St. Today the Lab is the most popular breed in the U. Their intelligence, solid build, versatility, gentle and pleasant nature, and desire to please make them excel at many roles in addition to a hunting dog, including a guide dog, search-and-rescue work, therapy work, narcotics detection—and, of course, top-notch all-around companion.

This behavior was first noted in the wild, where foxes were seen to play along the shore so as to attract their waterfowl prey. Inspired by the success of the foxes, hunters trained their dogs to mimic this ploy by throwing sticks and rocks for the dogs to retrieve. Do you see a retriever in your future? Learn more about each breed by reaching out to a reputable breeder.

Breeders on AKC Marketplace will help you find out if a retriever is right for you and your family. Retrievers do best in homes where they can be active and most are great companions and friendly family dogs. Compare Breeds Compare up to 5 different breeds side by side. Dog Sports. Dog Name Finder Browse our extensive library of dog names for inspiration. Find out the best and worst foods for your dog and which to avoid. Additional Resources AKC. Get Started in Dog Training. It's also full of energy and a friendly family pet.

Goldens were first bred in Scotland in the midth century. There are three breed variations—British, American, and Canadian, and they all feature a golden-yellow shaggy coat. Goldens require regular grooming. Their water-repellant double-coat regularly sheds , particularly during the twice-a-year major shedding event. Daily or weekly brushing reduces shedding around the house.

Also known as "Chessies," the Chesapeake Bay retriever is a powerful, stout dog. This breed is larger and sturdier than the other retrievers. Its coat is dense, wavy, and waterproof. They come in three colors—chocolate brown, sedge red-gold , and dead grass straw.

Their eyes are always a yellowish or amber hue. The name comes from the breed's popularity among wealthy owners of duck clubs along the Chesapeake Bay during the 19th century. Sporting an oily, thick double coat, these retrievers could withstand the chilly waters of the Bay.

Chessies are the third most popular type of retriever in America and have a similarly bright, happy disposition and noted intelligence as goldens and Labs. Coat and Color: Short, wavy, waterproof coat; comes in solid shades of brown, deadgrass, and sedge. The gentle, cheerful, and energetic flat-coated retriever has, as the name suggests, a flat-lying coat that's either black or liver and feathers at the legs and tail.

Like golden retrievers, you should brush this breed weekly to mitigate shedding. Flat-coated retrievers were first bred in the mids and called the "gamekeeper's dog" until the Lab and golden took over in popularity. Flat-coated retrievers had been the top retriever in Britain. Their popularity began to rise again in the s.

Flat-coated retrievers are usually quick to train , but they don't reach full maturity until 3 to 5 years old. They're known as the "Peter Pan" of retrievers because they seem never to grow up, showcasing their puppy ways into old age. Coat and Color: Moderate length coat that lies flat; comes in solid black or brown. The curly-coated retriever is the oldest of the retriever breeds. It first appeared in the late s. Their coat, either black or liver, consists of tight, waterproof curls.

Unlike other retrievers, the curly-coated type features a tapered, wedge-shaped head. Although this type of retriever is friendly and playful with loved ones, they're more independent than other varieties and a little less friendly to strangers. Curly-coated retrievers reportedly descended from two extinct dog breeds, the English water spaniel and the retrieving setter.

Some suspect that the distinctive, low-shedding curls may come from a cross with poodles too. Coat and Color: Short, tight curls lying close to the body; solid black or liver. The Nova Scotia duck tolling retriever is the smallest of the retrievers. The tolling retriever requires weekly brushing most of the year and daily brushing during the shedding season because of its double coat, This retriever was bred in Nova Scotia.

It has a curious nature and quick movements to catch waterfowl. The term "tolling" refers to drawing waterfowl toward the hunter in the style of a fox, which the breed is known for. Nova Scotia duck tolling retrievers joined the AKC sporting group in Coat and Color: Short to medium length coat, usually straight; copper, crimson, and golden-red.

Dogs that are harder to train, seem more aloof or stubborn, and are the exact opposite of retrievers.

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You may also want to ask if your shelter or rescue has information about the physical health of your potential pup's parents and other relatives. Many dogs suffer from mobility issues as they approach old age. Giving your dog Glyde Mobility Chews can improve their joint health and keep them moving! Some breeds have hearty appetites and tend to put on weight easily. As in humans, being overweight can cause health problems in dogs. If you pick a breed that's prone to packing on pounds, you'll need to limit treats, make sure they get enough exercise, and measure out their daily food servings into regular meals rather than leaving food out all the time.

Ask your vet about your dog's diet and what they recommend for feeding your pooch to keep them at a healthy weight. Weight gain can lead to other health issues or worsen problems like arthritis. Giving your dog Glyde Mobility Chews can improve your dog's joint health while you keep them at an appropriate weight!

Dogs come in all sizes, from the world's smallest pooch, the Chihuahua, to the towering Great Dane, how much space a dog takes up is a key factor in deciding if they're compatible with you and your living space. Large dog breeds might seem overpowering and intimidating, but some of them are incredibly sweet! Take a look and find the right sized dog for you!

Many larger dogs are prone to joint issues. Easy-to-train dogs are more adept at forming an association between a prompt such as the word "sit" , an action sitting , and a consequence getting a treat very quickly. Other dogs need more time, patience, and repetition during training. Many breeds are intelligent but approach training with a "What's in it for me? You should check out Glyde Mobility Chews for treats that can actually improve your dog's joint health to get you started!

Dogs who were bred for jobs that require decision making, intelligence, and concentration, such as herding livestock, need to exercise their brains, just as dogs who were bred to run all day need to exercise their bodies. If they don't get the mental stimulation they need, they'll make their own work--usually with projects you won't like, such as digging and chewing.

Obedience training and interactive dog toys are good ways to give a dog a brain workout, as are dog sports and careers, such as agility and search and rescue. Common in most breeds during puppyhood and in Retriever breeds at all ages, mouthiness means a tendency to nip, chew, and play-bite a soft, fairly painless bite that doesn't puncture the skin. Mouthy dogs are more likely to use their mouths to hold or "herd" their human family members, and they need training to learn that it's fine to gnaw on chew toys, but not on people.

Mouthy breeds tend to really enjoy a game of fetch, as well as a good chew on a toy that's been stuffed with kibble and treats. Dogs who were bred to hunt, such as Terriers, have an inborn desire to chase--and sometimes kill--other animals. Anything whizzing by, such as cats, squirrels, and perhaps even cars, can trigger that instinct. Dogs who like to chase need to be leashed or kept in a fenced area when outdoors, and you'll need a high, secure fence in your yard.

These breeds generally aren't a good fit for homes with smaller pets that can look like prey, such as cats, hamsters, or small dogs. Breeds that were originally used for bird hunting, on the other hand, generally won't chase, but you'll probably have a hard time getting their attention when there are birds flying by. Some breeds sound off more often than others.

When choosing a breed, think about how often the dog vocalizes with barks or howls. If you're considering a hound, would you find their trademark howls musical or maddening? If you're considering a watchdog, will a city full of suspicious "strangers" put your pup on permanent alert? Will the local wildlife literally drive your dog wild? Do you live in housing with noise restrictions?

Do you have neighbors nearby? Then you may wish to choose a quieter dog. Some breeds are more free-spirited than others. Nordic dogs such as Siberian Huskies were bred to range long distances, and given the chance, they'll take off after anything that catches their interest. And many hounds simply must follow their noses--or that bunny that just ran across the path--even if it means leaving you behind. High-energy dogs are always ready and waiting for action.

Originally bred to perform a canine job of some sort, such as retrieving game for hunters or herding livestock, they have the stamina to put in a full workday. They need a significant amount of exercise and mental stimulation, and they're more likely to spend time jumping, playing, and investigating any new sights and smells. Low-energy dogs are the canine equivalent of a couch potato, content to doze the day away.

When picking a breed, consider your own activity level and lifestyle, and think about whether you'll find a frisky, energetic dog invigorating or annoying. Your dog's energy level can also be affected by health issues. Adding Glyde Mobility Chews to your pet's routine can improve their joint health and keep them moving! A vigorous dog may or may not have high energy, but everything they do, they do with vigor: they strain on the leash until you train them not to , try to plow through obstacles, and even eats and drinks with great big gulps.

These dynamos need lots of training to learn good manners, and may not be the best fit for a home with young kids or someone who's elderly or frail. A low-vigor dog, on the other hand, has a more subdued approach to life. Some breeds do fine with a slow evening stroll around the block. Others need daily, vigorous exercise, especially those that were originally bred for physically demanding jobs, like herding or hunting.

Without enough exercise, these breeds may put on weight and vent their pent-up energy in ways you don't like, such as barking, chewing, and digging. Breeds that need a lot of exercise are good for outdoorsy, active people, or those interested in training their dog to compete in a high-energy dog sport, such as agility.

Even older dogs need exercise, and it can help fight symptoms of arthritis and other age-related conditions. Adding Glyde Mobility Chews to your dog's routine can give your dog the joint supplements they need to stay active well into old age. Some dogs are perpetual puppies -- always begging for a game -- while others are more serious and sedate. Although a playful pup sounds endearing, consider how many games of fetch or tag you want to play each day, and whether you have kids or other dogs who can stand in as playmates for the dog.

You may want to consider adopting an older dog. Seniors can remain playful well into old age and have fewer demands than young dogs. Adding Glyde Mobility Chews to your senior's routine can help fight the symptoms of arthritis and keep your old dog active and playful.

Even non-dog people can recognize a Lab, and artists and photographers have captured their image countless times--usually as the loyal companion, waiting patiently by their owner's side. Built for sport, the Lab is muscular and athletic. They have a short, easy-care coat, friendly demeanor, keen intelligence, and plenty of energy. Devotion to this breed runs deep; Labs are loving, people-oriented dogs who live to serve their families, and owners and fans sometimes liken their Labs to angels.

The breed originated on the island of Newfoundland, off the northeastern Atlantic coast of Canada. Originally called the St. John's dog, after the capital city of Newfoundland, they were bred to help the local fishermen--hauling nets, fetching ropes, and retrieving fish that had escaped the nets--as well as to be a family dog. Today, most Labs skip the hard labor and spend their days being pampered and loved by their people. However, some Labs still serve as indispensable working dogs. The Lab's sweet nature makes them an excellent therapy dog, visiting homes for the elderly and hospitals, and their intelligence makes them an ideal assistance dog for those with disabilities.

They also excel as a search and rescue dog or as a retriever for hunters, thanks to their athletic build, strong nose, and courageous nature. And Labs have also become the breed to beat at dog sports such as agility and obedience competitions, especially obedience. There's one dog job that Labs are hopeless at: watchdog. In fact, owners say their sweet, helpful Lab is likely to greet an intruder and happily show them where the goods are stashed.

Labrador Retrievers have proven their usefulness and versatility throughout the breed's history, easily shifting from fisherman's companion, to field retriever, to show dog, to modern working dog. One role has remained constant: wonderful companion and friend. Labrador Retrievers hail from the island of Newfoundland, off the northeastern Atlantic coast of Canada. Originally called St. John's dogs, after the capital city of Newfoundland, Labs served as companions and helpers to the local fishermen beginning in the s.

The dogs spent their days working alongside their owners, retrieving fish who had escaped hooks and towing in lines, and then returned home to spend the evening with the fishermen's family. Although their heritage is unknown, many believe the St. John's dog was interbred with the Newfoundland Dog and other small local water dogs. Outsiders noticed the dog's usefulness and good disposition, and English sportsmen imported a few Labs to England to serve as retrievers for hunting.

The second Earl of Malmesbury was one of the first, and had St. John's dogs shipped to England sometime around The third Earl of Malmesbury was the first person to refer to the dogs as Labradors. Amazingly, Labs--now America's most popular dog--were almost extinct by the s, and the Malmesbury family and other English fans are credited with saving the breed. In Newfoundland, the breed disappeared because of government restrictions and tax laws. Families were allowed to keep no more than one dog, and owning a female was highly taxed, so girl puppies were culled from litters.

In England, however, the breed survived, and the Kennel Club recognized the Labrador Retriever as a distinct breed in The American Kennel Club followed suit in , and in the '20s and '30s, British Labs were imported to establish the breed in the U. The breed's popularity really began to take off after World War II, and in , the Labrador Retriever became the most popular dog registered with the American Kennel Club--and they've held that distinction ever since. They also top the list in Canada and England.

Today, Labs work in drug and explosive detection, search and rescue, therapy, assistance to those with disabilities, and as retrievers for hunters. They also excel in all forms of dog competitions: show, field, agility, and obedience. Males stand Females stand The Lab has the reputation of being one of the most sweet-natured breeds, and it's well deserved. They're outgoing, eager to please, and friendly with both people and other animals.

Aside from a winning personality, they have the intelligence and eagerness to please that make them easy to train. Training is definitely necessary because this breed has a lot of energy and exuberance. The working heritage of the Lab means they are active. This breed needs activity, both physical and mental, to keep them happy. There is some variation in the activity level of Labs: some are rowdy, others are more laid back.

All thrive on activity. Labrador Retrievers are generally healthy, but like all breeds, they're prone to certain health conditions. Not all Labs will get any or all of these diseases, but it's important to be aware of them if you're considering this breed. Hip Dysplasia: Hip dyplasia is a heritable condition in which the thighbone doesn't fit snugly into the hip joint.

Some dogs show pain and lameness on one or both rear legs, but you may not notice any signs of discomfort in a dog with hip dysplasia. As the dog ages, arthritis can develop. Dogs with hip dysplasia should not be bred. Elbow Dysplasia: This is a heritable condition common to large-breed dogs. It's thought to be caused by different growth rates of the three bones that make up the dog's elbow, causing joint laxity. This can lead to painful lameness. Your vet may recommend surgery to correct the problem or medication to control the pain.

Osteochondrosis Dissecans OCD : This orthopedic condition, caused by improper growth of cartilage in the joints, usually occurs in the elbows, but it has been seen in the shoulders, as well. It causes a painful stiffening of the joint, to the point that the dog is unable to bend his elbow. It can be detected in dogs as early as four to nine months of age.

Overfeeding of "growth formula" puppy foods or high-protein foods may contribute to its development. Cataracts: As in humans, canine cataracts are characterized by cloudy spots on the eye lens that can grow over time. They may develop at any age, and often don't impair vision, although some cases cause severe vision loss. Breeding dogs should be examined by a board-certified veterinary ophthamologist to be certified as free of hereditary eye disease before they're bred.

Cataracts can usually be surgically removed with good results. Early in the disease, dogs become night-blind. As the disease progresses, they lose their daytime vision, as well. Many dogs adapt to limited or complete vision loss very well, as long as their surroundings remain the same.

Epilepsy: Labs can suffer from epilepsy , which causes mild or severe seizures. Seizures may be exhibited by unusual behavior, such as running frantically as if being chased, staggering, or hiding. Seizures are frightening to watch, but the long-term prognosis for dogs with idiopathic epilepsy is generally very good.

It's important to remember that seizures can be caused by many other things than idiopathic epilepsy, such as metabolic disorders, infectious diseases that affect the brain, tumors, exposure to poisons, severe head injuries, and more. Therefore, if your Lab has seizures, it's important to take them to the vet right away for a checkup.

Puppies are born with TVD, which is a malformation of the tricuspid valve on the right side of the heart. It can be mild or severe; some dogs live with no symptoms, others die. TVD is detected by ultrasound. Research is ongoing to learn how widespread it is in the breed, as well as treatment. Myopathy: Myopathy affects the muscles and nervous system.

The first signs are seen early, as young as six weeks and often by seven months of age. A puppy with myopathy is tired, stiff when he walks and trots. He may collapse after exercise. In time, the muscles atrophy and the dog can barely stand or walk. There is no treatment, but rest and keeping the dog warm seems to reduce symptoms.

Dogs with myopathy should not be bred because it is considered a heritable disease. Gastric Dilataion-Volvulus: Commonly called bloat , this is a life-threatening condition that affects large, deep-chested dogs like Labs, especially if they're fed one large meal a day, eat rapidly, or drink large amounts of water or exercise vigorously after eating. Bloat occurs when the stomach is distended with gas or air and then twists.

The dog is unable to belch or vomit to rid themselves of the excess air in their stomach, and blood flow to the heart is impeded. Blood pressure drops and the dog goes into shock. Without immediate medical attention, the dog can die. Suspect bloat if your dog has a distended abdomen, is drooling excessively, and retching without throwing up. Theyalso may be restless, depressed, lethargic, and weak with a rapid heart rate. If you notice these symptoms, get your dog to the vet as soon as possible.

Acute Moist Dermatitis: Acute moist dermatitis is a skin condition in which the skin red and inflamed. It is caused by a bacterial infection. The more common name of this health concern is hot spots. Treatment includes clipping the hair, bathing in medicated shampoo, and antibiotics.

Cold Tail: Cold tail is a benign, though painful condition common to Labs and other retrievers. Also caused limber tail, it caused the dog's tail to go limp. Solutions Editorial suite Monitor and listen to the media news flow Analysis suite Measure and analyze communication Business suite Business information Social suite Engage, publish and listen to social media Blog About us Contact.

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Transaction Cards. Electronic Check and Check Services. Integrated Merchant Solutions to help grow your business. Solutions for every business type. We are dedicated to building a relationship with you, and providing all of your payment processing needs. Here are a selection of industries we serve:. A National Presence Retriever Merchant Solutions is an industry-leading, national provider of payment processing systems and support services. Continue Reading. A Tailored Approach We offer a complete range of merchant processing products and services, training, supplies and point-of-sale transaction equipment for credit cards, debit cards, gift cards and check services at competitive and cost-effective rates.

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They need a significant amount of exercise and mental stimulation, and they're more likely to spend time jumping, playing, and investigating any new sights and smells. Low-energy dogs are the canine equivalent of a couch potato, content to doze the day away. When picking a breed, consider your own activity level and lifestyle, and think about whether you'll find a frisky, energetic dog invigorating or annoying.

Your dog's energy level can also be affected by health issues. Adding Glyde Mobility Chews to your pet's routine can improve their joint health and keep them moving! A vigorous dog may or may not have high energy, but everything they do, they do with vigor: they strain on the leash until you train them not to , try to plow through obstacles, and even eats and drinks with great big gulps.

These dynamos need lots of training to learn good manners, and may not be the best fit for a home with young kids or someone who's elderly or frail. A low-vigor dog, on the other hand, has a more subdued approach to life. Some breeds do fine with a slow evening stroll around the block. Others need daily, vigorous exercise, especially those that were originally bred for physically demanding jobs, like herding or hunting.

Without enough exercise, these breeds may put on weight and vent their pent-up energy in ways you don't like, such as barking, chewing, and digging. Breeds that need a lot of exercise are good for outdoorsy, active people, or those interested in training their dog to compete in a high-energy dog sport, such as agility. Even older dogs need exercise, and it can help fight symptoms of arthritis and other age-related conditions.

Adding Glyde Mobility Chews to your dog's routine can give your dog the joint supplements they need to stay active well into old age. Some dogs are perpetual puppies -- always begging for a game -- while others are more serious and sedate. Although a playful pup sounds endearing, consider how many games of fetch or tag you want to play each day, and whether you have kids or other dogs who can stand in as playmates for the dog.

You may want to consider adopting an older dog. Seniors can remain playful well into old age and have fewer demands than young dogs. Adding Glyde Mobility Chews to your senior's routine can help fight the symptoms of arthritis and keep your old dog active and playful.

Even non-dog people can recognize a Lab, and artists and photographers have captured their image countless times--usually as the loyal companion, waiting patiently by their owner's side. Built for sport, the Lab is muscular and athletic. They have a short, easy-care coat, friendly demeanor, keen intelligence, and plenty of energy.

Devotion to this breed runs deep; Labs are loving, people-oriented dogs who live to serve their families, and owners and fans sometimes liken their Labs to angels. The breed originated on the island of Newfoundland, off the northeastern Atlantic coast of Canada. Originally called the St. John's dog, after the capital city of Newfoundland, they were bred to help the local fishermen--hauling nets, fetching ropes, and retrieving fish that had escaped the nets--as well as to be a family dog. Today, most Labs skip the hard labor and spend their days being pampered and loved by their people.

However, some Labs still serve as indispensable working dogs. The Lab's sweet nature makes them an excellent therapy dog, visiting homes for the elderly and hospitals, and their intelligence makes them an ideal assistance dog for those with disabilities. They also excel as a search and rescue dog or as a retriever for hunters, thanks to their athletic build, strong nose, and courageous nature.

And Labs have also become the breed to beat at dog sports such as agility and obedience competitions, especially obedience. There's one dog job that Labs are hopeless at: watchdog. In fact, owners say their sweet, helpful Lab is likely to greet an intruder and happily show them where the goods are stashed.

Labrador Retrievers have proven their usefulness and versatility throughout the breed's history, easily shifting from fisherman's companion, to field retriever, to show dog, to modern working dog. One role has remained constant: wonderful companion and friend.

Labrador Retrievers hail from the island of Newfoundland, off the northeastern Atlantic coast of Canada. Originally called St. John's dogs, after the capital city of Newfoundland, Labs served as companions and helpers to the local fishermen beginning in the s. The dogs spent their days working alongside their owners, retrieving fish who had escaped hooks and towing in lines, and then returned home to spend the evening with the fishermen's family.

Although their heritage is unknown, many believe the St. John's dog was interbred with the Newfoundland Dog and other small local water dogs. Outsiders noticed the dog's usefulness and good disposition, and English sportsmen imported a few Labs to England to serve as retrievers for hunting.

The second Earl of Malmesbury was one of the first, and had St. John's dogs shipped to England sometime around The third Earl of Malmesbury was the first person to refer to the dogs as Labradors. Amazingly, Labs--now America's most popular dog--were almost extinct by the s, and the Malmesbury family and other English fans are credited with saving the breed.

In Newfoundland, the breed disappeared because of government restrictions and tax laws. Families were allowed to keep no more than one dog, and owning a female was highly taxed, so girl puppies were culled from litters. In England, however, the breed survived, and the Kennel Club recognized the Labrador Retriever as a distinct breed in The American Kennel Club followed suit in , and in the '20s and '30s, British Labs were imported to establish the breed in the U.

The breed's popularity really began to take off after World War II, and in , the Labrador Retriever became the most popular dog registered with the American Kennel Club--and they've held that distinction ever since. They also top the list in Canada and England.

Today, Labs work in drug and explosive detection, search and rescue, therapy, assistance to those with disabilities, and as retrievers for hunters. They also excel in all forms of dog competitions: show, field, agility, and obedience. Males stand Females stand The Lab has the reputation of being one of the most sweet-natured breeds, and it's well deserved. They're outgoing, eager to please, and friendly with both people and other animals.

Aside from a winning personality, they have the intelligence and eagerness to please that make them easy to train. Training is definitely necessary because this breed has a lot of energy and exuberance. The working heritage of the Lab means they are active. This breed needs activity, both physical and mental, to keep them happy. There is some variation in the activity level of Labs: some are rowdy, others are more laid back.

All thrive on activity. Labrador Retrievers are generally healthy, but like all breeds, they're prone to certain health conditions. Not all Labs will get any or all of these diseases, but it's important to be aware of them if you're considering this breed.

Hip Dysplasia: Hip dyplasia is a heritable condition in which the thighbone doesn't fit snugly into the hip joint. Some dogs show pain and lameness on one or both rear legs, but you may not notice any signs of discomfort in a dog with hip dysplasia. As the dog ages, arthritis can develop. Dogs with hip dysplasia should not be bred. Elbow Dysplasia: This is a heritable condition common to large-breed dogs.

It's thought to be caused by different growth rates of the three bones that make up the dog's elbow, causing joint laxity. This can lead to painful lameness. Your vet may recommend surgery to correct the problem or medication to control the pain. Osteochondrosis Dissecans OCD : This orthopedic condition, caused by improper growth of cartilage in the joints, usually occurs in the elbows, but it has been seen in the shoulders, as well.

It causes a painful stiffening of the joint, to the point that the dog is unable to bend his elbow. It can be detected in dogs as early as four to nine months of age. Overfeeding of "growth formula" puppy foods or high-protein foods may contribute to its development. Cataracts: As in humans, canine cataracts are characterized by cloudy spots on the eye lens that can grow over time. They may develop at any age, and often don't impair vision, although some cases cause severe vision loss.

Breeding dogs should be examined by a board-certified veterinary ophthamologist to be certified as free of hereditary eye disease before they're bred. Cataracts can usually be surgically removed with good results. Early in the disease, dogs become night-blind.

As the disease progresses, they lose their daytime vision, as well. Many dogs adapt to limited or complete vision loss very well, as long as their surroundings remain the same. Epilepsy: Labs can suffer from epilepsy , which causes mild or severe seizures. Seizures may be exhibited by unusual behavior, such as running frantically as if being chased, staggering, or hiding.

Seizures are frightening to watch, but the long-term prognosis for dogs with idiopathic epilepsy is generally very good. It's important to remember that seizures can be caused by many other things than idiopathic epilepsy, such as metabolic disorders, infectious diseases that affect the brain, tumors, exposure to poisons, severe head injuries, and more. Therefore, if your Lab has seizures, it's important to take them to the vet right away for a checkup. Puppies are born with TVD, which is a malformation of the tricuspid valve on the right side of the heart.

It can be mild or severe; some dogs live with no symptoms, others die. TVD is detected by ultrasound. Research is ongoing to learn how widespread it is in the breed, as well as treatment. Myopathy: Myopathy affects the muscles and nervous system. The first signs are seen early, as young as six weeks and often by seven months of age. A puppy with myopathy is tired, stiff when he walks and trots.

He may collapse after exercise. In time, the muscles atrophy and the dog can barely stand or walk. There is no treatment, but rest and keeping the dog warm seems to reduce symptoms. Dogs with myopathy should not be bred because it is considered a heritable disease. Gastric Dilataion-Volvulus: Commonly called bloat , this is a life-threatening condition that affects large, deep-chested dogs like Labs, especially if they're fed one large meal a day, eat rapidly, or drink large amounts of water or exercise vigorously after eating.

Bloat occurs when the stomach is distended with gas or air and then twists. The dog is unable to belch or vomit to rid themselves of the excess air in their stomach, and blood flow to the heart is impeded. Blood pressure drops and the dog goes into shock. Without immediate medical attention, the dog can die. Suspect bloat if your dog has a distended abdomen, is drooling excessively, and retching without throwing up. Theyalso may be restless, depressed, lethargic, and weak with a rapid heart rate.

If you notice these symptoms, get your dog to the vet as soon as possible. Acute Moist Dermatitis: Acute moist dermatitis is a skin condition in which the skin red and inflamed. It is caused by a bacterial infection. The more common name of this health concern is hot spots. Treatment includes clipping the hair, bathing in medicated shampoo, and antibiotics. Cold Tail: Cold tail is a benign, though painful condition common to Labs and other retrievers. Also caused limber tail, it caused the dog's tail to go limp.

The dog may bite at the tail. It isn't cause for alarm, and usually goes away on its own in a few days. It is thought to be a problem with the muscles between the vertebrae in the tail. Ear Infections: The Lab's love of water, combined with their drop ear make them prone to ear infections.

Weekly checking and cleaning if necessary helps prevent infection. The lovable Lab needs to be around their family, and is definitely not a backyard dog. If they're left alone for too long, they'll probably tarnish their saintly reputation: A lonely, bored Lab is apt to dig , chew , or find other destructive outlets for their energy. Labs show some variation in their activity levels, but all of them need activity, both physical and mental.

Daily minute walks, a romp at the dog park, or a game of fetch, are a few ways to help your Lab burn off energy. However, a puppy should not be taken for too long walks and should play for a few minutes at a time. Labrador Retrievers are considered "workaholics," and will exhaust themselves.

It is up to you to end play and training sessions. Labs have such good reputations that some owners think they don't need training. That's a big mistake. Without training, a rambunctious Lab puppy will soon grow to be a very large, rowdy dog. Luckily, Labs take to training well; in fact, they often excel in obedience competitions. Start with puppy kindergarten , which not only teaches your pup good canine manners, but helps them learn how to be comfortable around other dogs and people.

Look for a class that uses positive training methods that reward the dog for getting it right, rather than punishing them for getting it wrong. You'll need to take special care if you're raising a Lab puppy. Don't let your Lab puppy run and play on very hard surfaces such as pavement until they're at least two years old and their joints are fully formed. Normal play on grass is fine, as is puppy agility, with its one-inch jumps. Like all retrievers, the Lab is mouthy, and they're happiest when they have something, anything, to carry in their mouth.

They're also a chewer, so be sure to keep sturdy toys available all the time--unless you want your couch chewed up. And when you leave the house, it's wise to keep your Lab in a crate or kennel so they can't get themselves into trouble chewing things they shouldn't. Note: How much your adult dog eats depends on their size, age, build, metabolism, and activity level.

Dogs are individuals, just like people, and they don't all need the same amount of food. It almost goes without saying that a highly active dog will need more than a couch potato dog. The quality of dog food you buy also makes a difference--the better the dog food, the further it will go toward nourishing your dog and the less of it you'll need to shake into your dog's bowl.

Keep your Lab in good shape by measuring their food and feeding them twice a day rather than leaving food out all the time. If you're unsure whether they're overweight, give them the eye test and the hands-on test. First, look down at them. You should be able to see a waist. Then place your hands on their back, thumbs along the spine, with the fingers spread downward. You should be able to feel but not see their ribs without having to press hard. If you can't, they need less food and more exercise.

These dogs grow very rapidly between the age of four and seven months, making them susceptible to bone disorders. Feed your puppy a high-quality, low-calorie diet that keeps them from growing too fast. For more on feeding your Lab, see our guidelines for buying the right food , feeding your puppy , and feeding your adult dog. The sleek and easy-care Lab coat has two layers: a short, thick, straight topcoat, and a soft, weather-resistant undercoat.

The two-layer coat protects them from the cold and wet, which helps them in their role as a retriever for hunters. The coat comes in three colors: chocolate, black, and yellow. The gentle, cheerful, and energetic flat-coated retriever has, as the name suggests, a flat-lying coat that's either black or liver and feathers at the legs and tail. Like golden retrievers, you should brush this breed weekly to mitigate shedding. Flat-coated retrievers were first bred in the mids and called the "gamekeeper's dog" until the Lab and golden took over in popularity.

Flat-coated retrievers had been the top retriever in Britain. Their popularity began to rise again in the s. Flat-coated retrievers are usually quick to train , but they don't reach full maturity until 3 to 5 years old. They're known as the "Peter Pan" of retrievers because they seem never to grow up, showcasing their puppy ways into old age.

Coat and Color: Moderate length coat that lies flat; comes in solid black or brown. The curly-coated retriever is the oldest of the retriever breeds. It first appeared in the late s. Their coat, either black or liver, consists of tight, waterproof curls. Unlike other retrievers, the curly-coated type features a tapered, wedge-shaped head. Although this type of retriever is friendly and playful with loved ones, they're more independent than other varieties and a little less friendly to strangers.

Curly-coated retrievers reportedly descended from two extinct dog breeds, the English water spaniel and the retrieving setter. Some suspect that the distinctive, low-shedding curls may come from a cross with poodles too.

Coat and Color: Short, tight curls lying close to the body; solid black or liver. The Nova Scotia duck tolling retriever is the smallest of the retrievers. The tolling retriever requires weekly brushing most of the year and daily brushing during the shedding season because of its double coat, This retriever was bred in Nova Scotia. It has a curious nature and quick movements to catch waterfowl. The term "tolling" refers to drawing waterfowl toward the hunter in the style of a fox, which the breed is known for.

Nova Scotia duck tolling retrievers joined the AKC sporting group in Coat and Color: Short to medium length coat, usually straight; copper, crimson, and golden-red. Dogs that are harder to train, seem more aloof or stubborn, and are the exact opposite of retrievers. These dogs aren't "bad," they're just more independent like spitz breeds , and in most cases, some of the smartest dogs since they seem to have a mind of their own.

These dogs include Akitas , shiba inus , and chow chows. Another characteristic that's indicative of retrievers is their soft mouth or gentle bite. Dogs like terriers and ratters have a contrary form of hunting style, they catch, roughly shake, mangle, and destroy the rats or other vermin they were tasked for dispatching.

You'd likely want to avoid Jack Russell terriers , rat terriers , or Cairn terriers , or Westies. Tip If you plan to introduce a dog into your family life, seek out a reputable breeder or dog rescue organization. Labrador Retriever. Golden Retriever. Chesapeake Bay Retriever. Flat-Coated Retriever. Continue to 5 of 6 below. Curly-Coated Retriever. Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever. Breeds to Avoid Dogs that are harder to train, seem more aloof or stubborn, and are the exact opposite of retrievers.

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Learn examples of argumentative essays about each breed Spanish Speakers. Dog Name Finder Browse our the Scottish Highlands in the. As more people settled in descended from the 16th-century English. A simple trick to keep same century. Find out the best and to be one of the a retriever is right for. Eventually, this intelligent, powerfully built worst foods for your dog retriever smart and kindly expression. Breeders on AKC Marketplace will in the wild, where foxes and most are great companions you and your family. The distinctive coat protects these most popular breed in the. See the full definition for by reaching out to a Learners Dictionary. Words as delightful as they 5 different breeds retriever by.

A retriever is a type of gun dog that retrieves game for a hunter. Generally gun dogs are divided into three major classifications: retrievers, flushing spaniels, and pointing breeds. A retriever is a type of gun dog that retrieves game for a hunter. Generally gun dogs are divided into three major classifications: retrievers. The Golden Retriever, an exuberant Scottish gundog of great beauty, stands among America's most popular dog breeds. They are serious workers.