asians model minority essay

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A full set of resources to accompany this feature can be downloaded for free here. Calling all English teachers: does this sound familiar? As structure gcse english lit essay go through extracts in the last lesson on Friday afternoon, you ask carefully crafted questions, and note with satisfaction how students shoot their hands up in a flash, like Barry Allen on the run. Later, back at home, you mark them. What went wrong?

Asians model minority essay how to write degree essays

Asians model minority essay

Yoon Yoon, a doctoral candidate in gifted education at Purdue University, and Marcia Gentry, director of the Gifted Education Resource Institute at Purdue University, argue that equal representation of students by race and ethnicity is one of the major issues concerning gifted education programs. Yoon reports that on the national level, White and Asian American students have been consistently overrepresented in gifted programs, whereas American Indian, Alaska Native, Hispanic, and African American students have been and continue to be underrepresented This underrepresentation of minority students other than Asian Americans in gifted programs can be argued as racism.

However, it is not fair or accurate to assume that those underrepresented in gifted programs are lazy and unintelligent because there are many other social implications for these observations that often get overlooked. The model minority label also creates stereotypes for Asian and non-Asian minority groups, which plays a part in fueling discrimination in the U.

Non-Asian minority groups face stereotype threats with academic testing, which causes them to underperform. Sapna Cheryan and Galen Bodenhausen, from Northwestern University, investigated these negative effects of stereotypes on intellectual performance.

The low performance expectation that causes non-Asian students to underperform on testing is due partly to the Asian American model minority label. Because non-Asian minorities are compared to a high-performing minority group, a feeling of inferiority may arise, hindering academic performance. In addition to the underperformance of non-Asian minority groups because of the model minority label, Cheryan and Bodenhausen show that Asian students are negatively impacted by such a title as well.

Just as fear of confirming a negative stereotype can undermine performance, so fear of confirming a positive stereotype can undermine performance. Although Asian Americans are labeled the model minority, this stereotype can be limiting. The model minority label generates a racial stereotype which puts both Asian and non Asian students at a disadvantage because of stereotype threat, causing them to underperform on academic testing. Not only does the model minority label undermine academic performance for Asian students, but it can also lead to more serious consequences.

The pressure to succeed and overachieve often times becomes overwhelming and may even result in suicide, especially among young Asian American females between the ages of 15 and 24, who hold the highest suicide rates in the nation Le. The Chicago Tribune describes a study conducted by Joel Wong, an assistant professor of counseling and educational psychology at Indiana University, about the top reasons why Asians consider committing suicide.

This study shows that model minority expectations can produce expectations of success that can be overwhelming to many Asian Americans. Another example of the negative effects of stereotypes generated by the model minority label was investigated by Francis Dalisay and Alexis Tan, both a part of the Edward R. Dalisay and Tan were interested in the effects of exposure to information reinforcing the Asian American model minority stereotype on views of Asian Americans and African Americans.

Dalisay and Tan found that experimental participants were more likely to positively evaluate Asian Americans and negatively evaluate African Americans when exposed to the model minority stereotype. Because the model minority stereotype is widely accepted by many Americans, negative stereotypes are generated towards other minority groups such as African Americans and Latinos, reinforcing racist ideas.

The generation of negative stereotypes of non-Asian minority groups can also make these groups feel isolated and alienated. This feeling of alienation may lead to discriminatory feelings between minority groups. Such separation of minority groups is evident at many college campuses today in America. One specific example is at Berkeley University in California. In the state of California, Proposition was passed in , which eliminates racial preferences in public institutions.

As a result of Proposition 9 and its strict meritocracy, the rise of Asian students at the University of California, Berkeley campus has greatly increased at the expense of underrepresented blacks and Hispanics. Timothy Egan, a journalist for the New York Times, reports that Asian American enrollment is at an all-time high at elite colleges and universities, making other minority groups at these universities feel isolated and alone.

Staley also states that she does not identify with the Asian community as a minority. All minority groups have experienced some feelings of alienation in America and should be able to come together to cope with this issue, but instead are being pulled away from one another because of racial stereotypes generated by the model minority label. Liu insists that until all students from impoverished urban settings have equal access to advanced placement classes that have proved to be a ticket to the best colleges, then the idea of pure meritocracy is ridiculous Liu then claims that with Proposition , the State of California is trying to measure in a fair way the results of an already unfair system.

Because many Asian American students on the Berkeley campus have parents with college educations, they have easier access to resources that better prepare them for a college education, unlike other minority students who come from poor families with little access to good schools. Such a system of pure meritocracy is unfair and eliminates diversity from college campuses by isolating and alienating non-Asian minority groups.

As a result of the model minority label, Asian Americans are held at a high standard and are overpopulating elite college campuses, eliminating any chances of diversification and further separating minority groups. By labeling Asian Americans as the model minority, there are many negative consequences for all minority groups in the U. The model minority label generates negative stereotypes for Asian and non-Asians that put these groups at a disadvantage. Not only are negative stereotypes generated, but minority groups begin feeling alienated and isolated, which ultimately separates these groups from one another.

This separation of minority groups promotes and fuels more negative stereotypes as well as discrimination and racist beliefs. Cheryan, Sapna, and Galen V. Academic Search Premier. Chou, Chih-Chieh. Dalisay, Francis, and Alexis Tan. Graham, Judith. Over the years, many Americans have succumbed to the model minority myth, which describes a group of people as an "ideal" racial or ethnic minority.

Asian Americans in particular must battle this enduring stereotype, with many assuming that all Asian Americans work hard, do well in school, and go on to have successful careers. But these stereotypes — while ostensibly positive-sounding — ultimately do more harm than good. Because of the model minority myth, Asian Americans often receive less aid and support throughout their lives, particularly in their academic and professional endeavors.

This myth also overlooks the fact that Asian Americans are a diverse group of people, with unique cultures, backgrounds, and aspirations. Busting the model minority stereotype is necessary for ensuring diversity and racial equity in higher education. In this article, diversity, equity, and inclusion DEI specialist Farzana Nayani speaks on the persistence of this racist myth and the steps society must take to dismantle it.

The model minority myth is a concept that originated historically as a way of labeling Asian Americans as a model community of immigrants who have succeeded at the American dream. The myth developed as a result of both structured immigration policies allowing certain people from Asia to arrive in the U.

These "success stories" underrepresented the true spectrum of experiences that can be found within the Asian American community, or any community in general. The model minority myth overlooks the breadth of diversity within the Asian American community e. South Asian vs. East Asian ethnic groups, or differences in socioeconomic status and ignores groups that may struggle with economic, professional, or academic success due to systemic factors.

Ultimately, the myth diminishes attention to aid and access that are needed by underserved Asian American students. Painting Asian Americans as a monolith is problematic because it dispels any empathy for or attention to individuals or groups within the community that are in need of support or care. Asian Americans may also benefit from privileges afforded by this false narrative of being better than other minorities, thereby creating tension and conflict with other communities of color who do not receive those same benefits.

The model minority myth creates a wedge between Asian Americans and other people of color within the U. The myth also perpetuates racism. Asian Americans are viewed as perpetual foreigners who came to the U.

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Because of the model minority myth, Asian Americans often receive less aid and support throughout their lives, particularly in their academic and professional endeavors. This myth also overlooks the fact that Asian Americans are a diverse group of people, with unique cultures, backgrounds, and aspirations. Busting the model minority stereotype is necessary for ensuring diversity and racial equity in higher education.

In this article, diversity, equity, and inclusion DEI specialist Farzana Nayani speaks on the persistence of this racist myth and the steps society must take to dismantle it. The model minority myth is a concept that originated historically as a way of labeling Asian Americans as a model community of immigrants who have succeeded at the American dream.

The myth developed as a result of both structured immigration policies allowing certain people from Asia to arrive in the U. These "success stories" underrepresented the true spectrum of experiences that can be found within the Asian American community, or any community in general. The model minority myth overlooks the breadth of diversity within the Asian American community e. South Asian vs. East Asian ethnic groups, or differences in socioeconomic status and ignores groups that may struggle with economic, professional, or academic success due to systemic factors.

Ultimately, the myth diminishes attention to aid and access that are needed by underserved Asian American students. Painting Asian Americans as a monolith is problematic because it dispels any empathy for or attention to individuals or groups within the community that are in need of support or care. Asian Americans may also benefit from privileges afforded by this false narrative of being better than other minorities, thereby creating tension and conflict with other communities of color who do not receive those same benefits.

The model minority myth creates a wedge between Asian Americans and other people of color within the U. The myth also perpetuates racism. Asian Americans are viewed as perpetual foreigners who came to the U. It also prevents allyship with other communities of color who do not have the same privileges Asian Americans are perceived to possess due to this myth. American society must recognize and understand the diversity of experiences among Asian Americans by highlighting and uplifting a breadth of stories in the media and everyday life.

We need to include those who are not seen as belonging to this model minority. Yet, if the question refers to persons alive today, that may well be the correct reply. Like the Negroes, the Japanese have been the object of color prejudice When new opportunities, even equal opportunities, are opened up, the minority's reaction to them is likely to be negative — either self-defeating apathy or a hatred so all-consuming as to be self-destructive.

For the well-meaning programs and countless scholarly studies now focused on the Negro, we barely know how to repair the damage that the slave traders started. The history of Japanese Americans, however, challenges every such generalization about ethnic minorities. But as history shows, Asian-Americans were afforded better jobs not simply because of educational attainment, but in part because they were treated better.

But the greatest thing that ever happened to them wasn't that they studied hard, or that they benefited from tiger moms or Confucian values. It's that other Americans started treating them with a little more respect. At the heart of arguments of racial advancement is the concept of "racial resentment," which is different than "racism," Slate's Jamelle Bouie recently wrote in his analysis of the Sullivan article.

And, Bouie points out, "racial resentment" is simply a tool that people use to absolve themselves from dealing with the complexities of racism:. The 'racist,' after all, is a figure of stigma. Few people want to be one, even as they're inclined to believe the measurable disadvantages blacks face are caused by something other than structural racism. Framing blacks as deficient and pathological rather than inferior offers a path out for those caught in that mental maze.

Petersen's, and now Sullivan's, arguments have resurfaced regularly throughout the last century. And they'll likely keep resurfacing, as long as people keep seeking ways to forgo responsibility for racism — and to escape that "mental maze. Sometimes it's instructive to look at past rebuttals to tired arguments — after all, they hold up much better in the light of history.

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Americans as Model Minorities For 20 years, Asian Americans have been portrayed by the press and the media as a successful minority. Asian Americans are believed to benefit from astounding achievements in education, rising occupational statuses, increasing income, and are problem-fee in mental health and crime.

The idea of Asian Americans as a model minority has become the central theme in media portrayal of Asian Americans since the middle s. The term model minority is given to a minority group. The Model Minority theory is a concept that puts the assumption in the minds of people that all persons who are from Asian or of Asian decent are successful, smart, hard working, and model citizens who respect the authority of their country.

New and World Report, each published articles that gave praise to the great achievements of Asian Americans Fong While the theory might appear. They both acknowledge the reality of differential power amongst groups. The Pluralist Model masks it as competition while the Two-tiered model explains it as being disadvantaged due to race, color, sex or religion.

Despite or perhaps due to being a relatively small population, Asian Americans are not exempt from stereotyping. While a stereotype does not technically have positive or negative connotations. Challenges Faced By Ethnic Minority Supervisors in Clinical Supervision Personal Preparation My specialization paper will focus on the challenges faced by ethnic minority supervisors in clinical supervision.

My paper is guided by the courses I took in the doctoral program, my personal experience as a supervisor and the gaps in literature review that motivated me to pursue this area of research. In the past two and a half years of my doctoral program, I took courses advanced clinical supervision.

What Are Model Minorities? Being oblivious of these occurrences is the result of demoralizing Asian American problems in history. In a world of self fulfilling prophecies, these stereotypes may indeed in turn serve the Asian community in certain ways which are more positive than other types of stereotypes, further instilling these traits as simply what is natural and expected of their identities.

Moreover, stereotypes can cause Asians to be seen less as individuals and more as the sum of a group. Finally, stereotypes of any kind can pit racial groups against each other, sometimes causing jealousy, competition, and even more racism. But it is true that Asian Americans tend to favor majors in math and science than their non-Asian peers.

Perhaps one explanation is that the pressure to fulfill the expectations of the Model Minority Stereotype is so compelling. Growing up, I did know plenty of Asian American kids who excelled in mathematics and school in general. Later on, many of them went on to ivy league schools and became doctors and lawyers, all very typical and therefore falling into the stereotype. Stereotypes may be hard to break, and it is certainly not always easy to forge a brand new path out of such strong cultural expectations from both within and outside of the culture.

There is harm in every stereotype, whether seen as positive or negative. Stereotypes put people in easy to categorize boxes, rather than seeing them as individuals. In addition, the model minority myth operates alongside the myth of Asian Americans as perpetual foreigners. Buried under these stereotypes, the message is clear: Asian Americans are all the same—and all different from other Americans.

On one hand, Asian Americans are often perceived as having assimilated better than other minority groups. On the other hand, Asian Americans are seen as having some foreign quality that renders them perpetual outsiders. It can also set unrealistic expectations of Asian Americans.

If one is not able to meet those expectations, it can lead to feelings of inadequacy and self doubt. For example, asians are held to a higher standard in academia. This assumption puts an immense load of pressure on students and can cause mental health problems. However even when they have been negatively affected, Asian Americans are less likely to seek help. Asian American college students are 3x less likely to seek help for their mental health, but are 1.

The unreasonable standards make it hard for one to feel like they can, or should, speak up for themselves when they are struggling. Additionally, the Model Minority myth erases the fact that Asians have and still continue to face racism.

After the Magnuson Act was passed, it erased all the abominable acts of oppression towards Asians before then. The story of the Asian Americans focuses solely on the successes, like how they made it in America. The Model Minority myth also ignores the diversity of the different ethnic groups, and the challenges the individual groups face.

It clumps the different groups together, but when looking at the statistics, the different ethnic groups face different experiences. Homogenizing these groups also takes away the individuality of their cultures and experiences. It sets a notion that if the other minority groups worked like Asian Americans, they too can succeed.

It serves to contrast the minority groups and focus on the failings of the non-Asian communities and moves the accountability from the oppressor to another group that is still oppressed. The model minority myth is just one of a collection of stereotypes about Asian American people. Popular television and films exoticize Asian culture and peoples.